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Archive for the ‘autonomy’ tag

Anonymous

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The internet’s cyber radicals: heroes of the web changing the world | Technology | The Observer

The site is distinctive because users can post material anonymously, and some users have also organised themselves as a collective, using the name “Anonymous”. What does that actually mean?
As recently as six years ago, people were used to forums where you could lurk, you could view, but in order to post and participate, you had to register. Because you didn’t need to register on 4chan, people started to appreciate it, and realise how radically different it was. We began to see anonymity not just as an aspect or feature, but as a thing, as a principle, as an idea that we are one, we are a collective, we are Anonymous. People then came to the site who not only saw Anonymous as a principle, but started to exploit anonymity as a new platform where they could be rebellious and no one knew who they were. 

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January 2nd, 2011 at 7:54 pm

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Smart saying about autonomy

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“DOING WHAT YOU’RE TOLD NOT TO DO IS NOT THE SAME AS NOT DOING AS YOU’RE TOLD”

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June 8th, 2010 at 3:58 pm

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generative art

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eu-gene list

Philip Galanter, a Professor at the New York University: “Generative art refers to any art practice where the artist creates a process, such as a set of natural language rules, a computer program, a machine, or other mechanism, which is then set into motion with some degree of autonomy contributing to or resulting in a completed work of art.”

 

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January 6th, 2010 at 12:37 pm

Autonomism

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Autonomism – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Autonomist theory

Unlike other forms of Marxism, autonomist Marxism emphasises the ability of the working class to force changes to the organisation of the capitalist system independent of the state, trade unions or political parties. Autonomists are less concerned with party political organisation than other Marxists, focusing instead on self-organised action outside of traditional organisational structures. Autonomist Marxism is thus a “bottom up” theory: it draws attention to activities that autonomists see as everyday working class resistance to capitalism, for example absenteeism, slow working, and socialisation in the workplace.

Like other Marxists, autonomists see class struggle as being of central importance. However, autonomists have a broader definition of the working class than other Marxists: as well as wage-earning workers (both white collar and blue collar), autonomists also include the unwaged (students, the unemployed, homemakers etc), who are traditionally deprived of any form of union representation.

Early theorists (such as Mario Tronti, Antonio Negri, Sergio Bologna and Paolo Virno) developed notions of “immaterial” and “social labour” that extended the Marxist concept of labour to all society. They suggested that modern society’s wealth was produced by unaccountable collective work, and that only a little of this was redistributed to the workers in the form of wages. They emphasised the importance of feminism and the value of unpaid female labour to capitalist society.

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October 1st, 2008 at 8:31 am

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labour makes you autonomus

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Capital attempts to maximise exploitation either ’absolutely’ (by
extending the working day) or ’relatively’ (by raising the intensity or
productivity of labour). But workers, both in daily practice and
organised struggle, persistently initiate their own, very different
project. Seeking a secure, full, plenitudinous life that escapes the
reduction to mere labour-power, they set in motion a counter-logic that
defies capital’s by either forcing up the wage level or lowering the
duration and pace of the working day. These efforts by workers to
reclaim the values they themselves have produced are not merely
’economistic,’ but strike at capital’s intrinsically political command
over labour-power. The horizon to which they point is the separation of
labour from capital. Ultimately ; capital needs labour, but labour does
not need capital.
Labour, as the source of production, can dispense
with the wage relation : it is potentially autonomous.

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August 20th, 2008 at 5:11 pm

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