research

on synchronisity of art and culture, technology and science, sociology and anthropology

Archive for the ‘art as a way of living’ tag

kalkulacija uspjeha

without comments

Gadji beri bimba? Glandridi laula lonni cadori! – H-Alter – Udruga za medijsku kulturu

Dakle, od dadaizma možemo nau?iti i to: pokušaj i odvažnost važniji su od rezultata i kalkulacija uspjeha. Ali tome prethodi stvaranje uvjeta mogu?nosti, što se može nazvati i slobodom. Sloboda je stvar vrste odluke i upornog rada, a ne dar s neba koji zati?e “siromašne duhom”.

 

Written by

February 19th, 2016 at 6:47 pm

the end of art as a pure ‘thing’

without comments

The Future of Art – Nick Stewart – Appropedia: The sustainability wiki

Essentially, art is structured in consciousness. Objects and images are but evidence, a trace, left after the activity of art has ended. We substitute this evidence, objects and images, for a living process and so remove the potentiality of art from everyday life. Art as a quality of life would mean the end of art as a pure ‘thing’, something separate from the rest of life.

Written by

February 13th, 2015 at 8:05 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Tagged with ,

curator artist

without comments

Since the 1990s the position of the curator as a producer of ideas and an author has been debated amongst artists and scholars.

Written by

September 7th, 2013 at 6:03 pm

Reclaim

without comments

Podopolog

Full bodily exploration and geodesic time-space is Not an outmoded, obsolete, game-over scenario; We may need to reclaim and defend the ‘old world’ or the ‘old territories’ for any meaningful and inhabitable future.

Written by

August 15th, 2013 at 4:13 pm

promoting well-being

without comments

Agape – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Thomas Jay Oord has defined agape as “an intentional response to promote well-being when responding to that which has generated ill-being.”[3]

Written by

May 28th, 2013 at 9:12 am

The changing role of art in society

without comments

Fields Q & A session

A premise behind this question is that practices which were once subsumed under terms such as media art, digital art, art-and-technology, art-and-science, have become so diversified that no single term can work as a signpost any more. The assumption is also that typically those practices are transdisciplinary and socially engaged, combining imaginative use of technologies old and new with participatory processes and interventions in the social fabric. The changing role of art in society is one where it does not just create a new aesthetics but gets involved in patterns of social, scientific, and technological transformations.

Written by

May 25th, 2013 at 11:57 am

I celebrate

without comments

I celebrate my gifts by sharing my talents with the world. Uniting with others enhances all I do.

Written by

December 13th, 2011 at 9:26 pm

Participation

without comments

Premio Internazionale di Arte Partecipativa

Art which interacts with an area and its communities to produce models for social change.

An art form which goes beyond the conventional market-driven strategies of contemporary art to become a source of inspiration embedded in the local community.

A stimulus for thought and debate.

A means for encouraging new forms of collaboration.

…very original idea of using art as a meeting of the ways and a place for discussion between those who are elected to govern and those who are governed.

Written by

December 9th, 2011 at 10:27 am

abundance

without comments

nettime> Roberto Verzola: Abundance and the Generative Logic of the Commons
(Question: before refrigerators, what did people do when they had too much food? Answer: they threw a party!)

Human societies learned early on to deal with abundance including temporary ones from forests, rivers, and other hunting and gathering areas by managing them as commons. Taken for granted for a long time, the oceans, the atmosphere, and other global commons are just getting due attention.

Likewise, the creative commons of information, knowledge and culture are now getting renewed attention with the rise of the Internet which, by the way, has become a great showcase of both the concepts of commons and abundance (and their problems, too).

Written by

November 25th, 2010 at 9:43 am

“dialogical self” goes beyond the self-other dichotomy

without comments

Dialogical self – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Dialogical Self Theory (DST) weaves two concepts, self and dialogue, together in such a way that a more profound understanding of the interconnection of self and society is achieved. Usually, the concept of self refers to something “internal,” something that takes place within the mind of the individual person, while dialogue is typically associated with something “external,” that is, processes that take place between people involved in communication. 

The composite concept “dialogical self” goes beyond the self-other dichotomy by infusing the external to the internal and, in reverse, to introduce the internal into the external. As functioning as a “society of mind”[1], the self is populated by a multiplicity of “self-positions” that have the possibility to entertain dialogical relationships with each other.

Written by

September 6th, 2010 at 1:34 pm

transferred to another post

without comments

Hermann Hesse, Magister Ludi [Das Glasperlenspiel]

Mark well: one can be a strict logician or grammarian and yet be full of fantasy and music. One can be a musician or a bead-player, and yet be devoted to law and order. The person whom we take as our ideal and try to emulate should be able at all times to exchange his art or science for any other, should allow the most crystal clear logic to radiate from his Bead Game and display the most creative fantasy in grammar. That is how we should be, and we should be prepared at any moment to be transferred to another post without opposition or allowing ourselves to become confused.

Written by

March 10th, 2010 at 10:29 pm

Process art

without comments

Systems art – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Process art is an artistic movement as well as a creative sentiment and world view where the end product of art and craft, the objet d’art, is not the principal focus. The ‘process’ in process art refers to the process of the formation of art: the gathering, sorting, collating, associating, and patterning. Process art is concerned with the actual doing; art as a rite, ritual, and performance. Process art often entails an inherent motivation, rationale, and intentionality. Therefore, art is viewed as a creative journey or process, rather than as a deliverable or end product.

Written by

January 30th, 2010 at 12:29 pm

“artistic surfing” (aka “surf clubbing,” “spirit surfing”)

without comments

Curt Cloninger
Black Mountain, North Carolina, US
February 2009

What I’m calling “artistic surfing” (aka “surf clubbing,” “spirit surfing”) takes its inspiration from group blogging, particularly anonymous group photoblogs like 4chan.org. Internet “surf clubs” are basically invitation-only group photoblogs where artists surf the internet intuitively and obliquely, collect detritus (predominantly from commercial sites and social networking sites), recontextualize it via bricolage, titling, and Photoshop remixing, and post it at the surf club’s blog where it is often further recontextualized and reposted.

Written by

January 29th, 2010 at 3:20 pm

Relational Art

without comments

Nicolas Bourriaud explores this notion of relational aesthetics through examples of what he calls Relational Art. According to Bourriaud, Relational Art encompasses “a set of artistic practices which take as
their theoretical and practical point of departure the whole of human relations and their social context, rather than an independent and private space.’

Written by

August 30th, 2008 at 12:24 am

Relational Aesthetics

without comments

A relational artist might, for example, convert a gallery space into a temporary stand for serving coffee, with the addition
of background music, suitable lighting, books to read, and comfortable chairs. The artwork here consists of creating a social
environment in which people come together to participate in a shared activity. Bourriaud claims “the role of artworks is no
longer to form imaginary and utopian realities, but to actually be ways of living and models of action within the existing real,
whatever scale chosen by the artist.” [4]

Written by

August 20th, 2008 at 5:11 pm