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Archive for the ‘mind menagement’ tag

a tremendous waste of human potential

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kundalini_syndrome

Bentov went so far as to speculate:

The psychological symptoms tend to mimic schizophrenia. It is very likely, therefore, that such individuals may be diagnosed as schizophrenics and be either institutionalized or given very drastic and unwarranted treatment. It is ironic that persons in whom the evolutionary processes of Nature have begun to operate more rapidly, and who can be considered as advanced mutants of the human race, are institutionalized as subnormal by their normal peers. I dare to guess, on the basis of discussions with my psychiatrist-friends, that this process is not as exotic and rare as one would like to believe, and possibly 25 to 30 percent of all institutionalized schizophenics belong to this category – a tremendous waste of human potential. It is my hope that as the material presented here gradually reaches the more open-minded physicians and psychotherapists, and as the syndrome described becomes more widely known, nontraumatic methods of dealing with these symptoms will be developed, methods that will not stop but slow down and control the rate at which the evolutionary process is progressing, thus allowing the patients to develop at a safe, acceptable rate and to function normally in everyday environment.
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October 24th, 2012 at 8:27 am

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symptoms of having lost one’s sanity

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Atheism in Hinduism – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Dharmakirti, a 7th century Buddhist philosopher deeply influenced by c?rv?ka philosophy, wrote in Pramanvartik:[13]

Believing that the Veda are standard (holy or divine), believing in a Creator for the world,
Bathing in holy waters for gaining punya, having pride (vanity) about one’s caste,
Performing penance to absolve sins,
Are the five symptoms of having lost one’s sanity.

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April 2nd, 2011 at 9:12 pm

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dominant in capitalism

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Rhizomes 11/12: Rosi Braidotti

 

The ‘noble’ side of this vision concerns a political economy of affects such as mourning and melancholia, which I consider as a dominant ideology in capitalist culture.

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December 20th, 2009 at 9:44 am

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Metanarratives

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Metanarrative – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

… attempts to construct grand theories tend to dismiss the naturally existing chaos and disorder of the universe. Second, metanarratives are created and reinforced by power structures and are therefore not to be trusted. ‘Metanarratives’ ignore the heterogeneity or variety of human existence. They are also seen to embody unacceptable views of historical development, in terms of progress towards a specific goal.

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October 21st, 2009 at 6:02 am

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awareness – Alfred Korzybski

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Alfred Korzybski – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Korzybski’s work held a view that human beings are limited in what they know by (1) the structure of their nervous systems, and (2) the structure of their languages. Human beings cannot experience the world directly, but only through their “abstractions” (nonverbal impressions or “gleanings” derived from the nervous system, and verbal indicators expressed and derived from language). Sometimes our perceptions and our languages actually mislead us as to the “facts” with which we must deal. Our understanding of what is going on sometimes lacks similarity of structure with what is actually going on. He stressed training in awareness of abstracting, using techniques that he had derived from his study of mathematics and science. He called this awareness, this goal of his system, “consciousness of abstracting.” His system included modifying the way we approach the world, e.g., with an attitude of “I don’t know; let’s see,” to better discover or reflect its realities as shown by modern science. One of these techniques involved becoming inwardly and outwardly quiet, an experience that he called, “silence on the objective levels.”

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March 23rd, 2009 at 7:32 pm

Subliminal messages software for 29.95

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February 16th, 2009 at 8:54 pm

“The Metropolis and Mental Life”

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The concept of the flâneur is important in academic discussions of the phenomenon of modernity.
While Baudelaire’s aesthetic and critical visions helped open up the
modern city as a space for investigation, theorists, such as Georg Simmel,
began to codify the urban experience in more sociological and
psychological terms. In his essay “The Metropolis and Mental Life”,
Simmel theorizes that the complexities of the modern city create new
social bonds and new attitudes towards others. The modern city was
transforming humans, giving them a new relationship to time and space,
inculcating in them a “blasé attitude”, and altering fundamental
notions of freedom and being:

The deepest problems of
modern life derive from the claim of the individual to preserve the
autonomy and individuality of his existence in the face of overwhelming
social forces, of historical heritage, of external culture, and of the
technique of life. The fight with nature which primitive man has to
wage for his bodily existence attains in this modern form its latest
transformation. The eighteenth century called upon man to free himself
of all the historical bonds in the state and in religion, in morals and
in economics. Man’s nature, originally good and common to all, should
develop unhampered. In addition to more liberty, the nineteenth century
demanded the functional specialization of man and his work; this
specialization makes one individual incomparable to another, and each
of them indispensable to the highest possible extent. However, this
specialization makes each man the more directly dependent upon the
supplementary activities of all others. Nietzsche sees the full
development of the individual conditioned by the most ruthless struggle
of individuals; socialism believes in the suppression of all
competition for the same reason. Be that as it may, in all these
positions the same basic motive is at work: the person resists to being
leveled down and worn out by a social-technological mechanism. An
inquiry into the inner meaning of specifically modern life and its
products, into the soul of the cultural body, so to speak, must seek to
solve the equation which structures like the metropolis set up between
the individual and the super-individual contents of life. (“The
Metropolis and Mental Life”)

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February 2nd, 2009 at 10:47 am

control-information society

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Multitudes Web – Autonomist Marxism and the Information Society

Beneath the rosy images of the information society lie
the stark goals of ’control and reduction in the costs of labour’
(Negri 1978, 254).

Such analysis is by no means unique to autonomists.
Indeed awareness of the role of informatics in the neoliberal assault
on the working class has generated an influential line of quasi-Marxist
’neo-Luddism’. Based largely on ’labour process’ perspectives derived
froth Braverman’s (1974) seminal studies on the ’degradation of work’,
but with important strands in media studies, this seeks to expose the
new technologies as instruments for deskilling and ’mind management’
(Schiller 1976) and to revive, at least intellectually, the resistant
tradition of 19th century machine-breakers (e.g. Noble, 1983, 1984 ;
Webster and Robins 1986).

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August 20th, 2008 at 5:11 pm